International Tax News Blog

Archives: September 2019

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  • Brazil's tax reform proposals have greatest chance of success

    International Tax ReviewBy Mattias Cruz Cano

    Taxpayers and advisors say Brazil’s proposal to overhaul the multiple indirect tax regimes and rates into a single system have a good chance of succeeding because of the need for simpler tax rules. But progress will be slow.

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    By Cano, Mattias Cruz, posted on Friday September 27, 2019
  • EU court rules in favour of Starbucks, but against Fiat over state aid

    International Tax ReviewBy Anjana Haines

    Starbucks has won its case against the European Commission’s 2015 state aid decision today, but the EC clawed back a win against Fiat Chrysler in two conflicting cases over the use of the transactional net margin method.

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    By Haines, Anjana, posted on Friday September 27, 2019
  • How could the TMT industry respond to digital tax proposals?

    International Tax ReviewKaidi Liu and Sajeev Sidher

    The technology, media and telecommunications (TMT) sector may be directly affected by the G20/OECD digital economy tax proposals. Sajeev Sidher and Kaidi Liu of Deloitte Tax LLP look at the uncertainties ahead.

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    By Liu, Kaidi and Sidher, Sajeev, posted on Friday September 27, 2019
  • Chilean government introduces important changes to proposed tax on digital services

    International Tax ReviewBy Fernando Binder

    Sandra Benedetto and Fernando Binder analyse several amendments made by the Chilean government to the Tax Bill submitted to Congress in August last year, one of which seeks to tax digital services with value added tax (VAT).

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    By Binder, Fernando, posted on Friday September 27, 2019
  • Netherlands Planning Slower But Deeper Corporate Tax Cut

    Tax News logoBy Ulrika Lomas

    On September 17, 2019, Dutch State Secretary for Finance Menno Snel presented the Government's 2020 Tax Plan to the House of Representatives. It includes revised plans for corporate tax cuts. Under legislation approved in December 2018, the rate of corporate tax on income exceeding EUR200,000 (USD221,000) was due to fall from 25 percent to 22.55 percent in 2020 and to 20.5 percent in 2021. However, under the new proposals, corporate tax above this threshold will remain at 25 percent next year, before falling to 21.7 percent in 2021.

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    By Lomas, Ulrika, posted on Friday September 27, 2019
  • Why a wealth tax is capitalism’s handmaiden

    Financial TimesBy FT Analyst

    Taxing capital holdings boosts rewards for investing well.

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    By FT Analyst, posted on Thursday September 26, 2019
  • Klobuchar Presses Treasury on Companies Offshoring Operations

    Bloomberg By Siri Bulusu

    Sen. Amy Klobuchar has asked Treasury if it is taking steps to block companies from offshoring jobs because of tax incentives.

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    By Siri Bulusu, posted on Thursday September 26, 2019
  • EU Attacks Apple’s Phantom Menace, Draws Irish Ire in Tax Clash (1)

    Bloomberg By Aoife White and Stephanie Bodoni

    Apple Inc. and Ireland’s court room clash with the European Commission finally lived up to its billing as the world’s biggest tax case.

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    By Aoife White and Stephanie Bodoni, posted on Thursday September 26, 2019
  • Drop Plans to Cut Corporate Tax, Dutch Opposition Urges

    Bloomberg By Linda Thompson

    Dutch opposition lawmakers are pressing the government to abandon plans to cut the headline corporate tax rate by almost four percentage points in 2021.

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    By Linda Thompson, posted on Thursday September 26, 2019
  • Carbon Taxes Worldwide Too Low to Change Behavior, OECD Finds

    Bloomberg By Isabel Gottlieb

    The world’s biggest polluting countries aren’t doing enough to tax carbon consumption and encourage cleaner energy, an OECD report found.

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    By Isabel Gottlieb, posted on Thursday September 26, 2019


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