International Tax News Blog

Archives: July 2019

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  • Enhanced accounting standards could curb investor tax frustrations

    International Tax ReviewBy Danish Mehboob

    Companies are starting to explore whether the UK corporate Accountability Network’s latest accountancy framework, which requires tax data to be included in financial accounts for investor analysis, benefits their tax and business strategies. 

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    By Mehboob, Danish, posted on Wednesday July 31, 2019
  • France Urges Trump: 'Don't Mix Digital Taxes and Wine Tariffs'

    NYT logoBy Reuters

    Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said on Saturday that France would proceed with taxing revenues of big technology firms and urged the United States not to bring trade tariffs into the debate on how to fairly raise levies on digital services.

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    By Reuters, posted on Wednesday July 31, 2019
  • Status Check on TCJA Guidance

    Tax AnalystsBy Mindy Herzfeld

    In the first of a series on guidance addressing the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, Mindy Herzfeld reviews final and proposed regulations interpreting the TCJA’s changes to cross-border taxation.

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    By Mindy Herzfeld, posted on Wednesday July 31, 2019
  • IRS Considering Changing FDII Manufacturing Rule for IP

    Tax AnalystsBy Andrew Velarde

    The IRS is considering changing its foreign-derived intangible income provisions to allow for the application of the manufacturing rule to licensed intangible property.

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    By Andrew Velarde, posted on Wednesday July 31, 2019
  • Trump Uncorks Trouble for France Over Digital Services Tax

    Tax AnalystsBy Stephanie Soong Johnston

    After hitting out on Twitter at France's newly enacted digital services tax and arguing that the United States, not France, should tax American tech companies, President Trump hinted at a potential tax on French wines.

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    By Stephanie Soong Johnston, posted on Wednesday July 31, 2019
  • New York City Will Not Follow State’s New Treatment of GILTI

    Tax AnalystsBy Amy Hamilton

    New York City intentionally is not conforming to the state’s newly enacted law exempting 95 percent of global intangible low-taxed income from the state corporate franchise tax base, according to a city finance official.

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    By Amy Hamilton, posted on Wednesday July 31, 2019
  • The Next MLI: Rejection Is Just Around the Corner

    Tax AnalystsBy Robert Goulder

    Robert Goulder examines the efforts of the OECD Inclusive Framework and predicts the United States will never implement the resulting recommendations, despite playing a critical role in their formulation.

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    By Robert Goulder, posted on Wednesday July 31, 2019
  • Trump Says U.S. to Take Action Against France for Tax on American Tech Companies

    WSJ logoBy Vivian Salama and Josh Zumbrun

    President Trump promised to take “substantial reciprocal action” against France after the nation’s President Emmanuel Macron this week signed into law a tax on American tech giants like Alphabet Inc. ’s Google andAmazon.com Inc. “France just put a digital tax on our great American technology companies,” Mr. Trump said on Twitter on Friday. 

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    By Salama, Vivian and Zumbrun, Josh, posted on Tuesday July 30, 2019
  • Diageo Expects To Pay Up To $340M For Voided UK Tax Break

    Logo - Law 360By Joseph Boris

    Global drinks giant Diageo expects to make a payment next year of as much as £275 million ($340 million), it has said, to cover a U.K. tax break that the European Union has deemed an illegal subsidy to multinational companies.

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    By Boris, Joseph, posted on Tuesday July 30, 2019
  • Carbon tax shows new signs of life in Congress

    The HillBy Miranda Green

    Members of Congress on both sides of the aisle are introducing competing bills that aim to put a tax on carbon. The push to regulate greenhouse gas emissions come as both Democrats and Republicans face pressure from their constituents, and in some cases the fossil fuel industry itself, to regulate carbon emissions that lead to climate change.

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    By Green, Miranda, posted on Tuesday July 30, 2019


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